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Interview with Fort Hays State University

Interview with Fort Hays State University

Professor Jenny Manry is an associate professor at Fort Hays State University teaching family nurse practitioner students at the graduate and doctoral levels.

On playing a game of ‘Hot Potato’ in a graduate Nurse Practitioner course:
This semester I did an activity for nurse practitioner students called “Hot Potato”. This was an opportunity for students to create case studies over the information they had covered to date in the course. They were asked to provide the subjective data and objective case data which outlined the chief complaints and symptoms as well as the assessment data on exam. The “Hot Potato” game lasted for 3 days. Each student had three opportunities to be “tagged” by instructors. When tagged students had a timeframe of 10 hours to present a case. Initial cases were worth 40 points.

[Those] students then were required to “tag” three other students in the course. These students had 10 hours to respond with what they felt the diagnosis. In addition, they were required to create a plan with treatment and patient education. It became very competitive as students would watch the leaderboard and be selective about who they were tagging. The student response posts were worth 10 points. Instructors had the opportunity to give instructor badges which were worth 50 points.

Are there any case studies that you remember that were particularly hard to diagnose?
In general, most of the cases turned out to be a lot more complicated than what they would have been in actual practice because the students were tasked to avoid the “routine” cases seen in practice. So I think they were all more difficult.

And did the students come up with cases by looking at textbook information or online sources? What was their process?
Most of it was based on what we were learning at the time. Through lectures and online resources, they were able to create cases that were educational. They tried to make it more difficult than just the routine case.

On how Yellowdig made the course more interactive:
The feedback with the discussion boards— I definitely think that the students liked it a lot better. I found especially in the introductions, students were much more likely— probably 99% more likely— to add pictures of themselves or of their families and be much more interactive, versus just a discussion board that says “Hi, this who I am.” So I definitely think that it provided for a lot more interaction. Even with just an introduction, students would take selfies or add pictures of their children without me even asking them to so. I was really surprised by that.

I think [Yellowdig] did make it much more personable compared to just a static discussion board. I have had students come up with case studies in the past on paper and there’s usually not a lot of interaction when compared to doing it this way. There was a lot more interaction this way.

That sounds great, that’s exactly what we were hoping would happen! Did any of the Yellowdig posts or virtual discussions translate into interactions in the classroom?
Well, [the students] come to campus five times a semester. Maybe have them start cases online and then be able to discuss the top five discussed cases by bringing them to campus.

Educause Article by Jeremy Petranka of Duke

Educause Article by Jeremy Petranka of Duke

Interview with Lance Frazier at Creighton

Interview with Lance Frazier at Creighton